#religion, folklore, guide, Guides, history of magic, history of nature and science, how-to, magick, Spiritual Literature, spirituality, Uncategorized, witchcraft

The MoonLightShop, “How to Start Being a Wiccan,” https://themoonlightshop.com/blogs/news/how-to-start-being-a-wiccan (Accessed, October 7, 2018), Pp. 11

Wicca article .JPGHave you ever wanted to understand or practice Wicca? If so then this short article is a quick and informative resource to tap into. Not only does this article briefly overview the important key features of Wicca it also defines many of the crucial elements of Wicca–no pun intended! For example, this article enlightens the reader to what Magick,  the Wiccan Rede, the Three-Fold Law, Book of Shadows, Sabbats, where to connect with a coven, and what a pentacle is and stands for. One shortcoming was the lack of resources this article rendered for the reader. Other than name dropping the two most popular authors on Wicca/Wiccan tradition and practice, Scott Cunningham and Raymond Buckland, the article failed to provide any other resource for reader. Although this article had some downfalls it was made up for in the way the article defined and provided a succinct overview of The Craft.  I would definitely  recommend this short read to anyone who is interested in Wicca. Its enough to spark your interest in magick!

Source: https://themoonlightshop.com/blogs/news/how-to-start-being-a-wicca

Picture Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/wicca

 

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Astrology, Horoscope, Inspiration, Instructional, magick, spirituality, Uncategorized, Zodiac

Article Review: Yearly-Horoscope.Org (https://www.yearly-horoscope.org/october-2018-monthly/, Accessed 9-21-18), Pp. 12

October is just around the corner and I am wondering what it has on tap?

I looked to this article by Yearly-Horoscope.Org and it seems pretty dang accurate for me! Take a look at your horoscope and let me know if you agree that seems like it is on track with your fall beginnings!

Happy Fall!

 

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(Picture Source: https://www.universetoday.com/61121/hunters-moon/)

#feminism, black feminism, black feminist history, feminism, feminist agendas of the 1970s, feminist studies, feminist theory, lgbtq, politics, Uncategorized, women, women and gender studies

Article Review: Combahee River Collective, “A Black Feminist Statement” (1977)

combahee .jpg

(Photo Credits: https://combaheerivercollective.weebly.com/)

This article is produced by a group of black feminist  in the mid-70s. They outline four major topics that they provide as their mission statement. These topics included: “the genesis of contemporary black feminism,”“ specific province of our politics,” organization and unity problems and a “brief herstory of our collective,” and  “Black feminist issues and practice” (271-280). These topics provided a framework for this group ,of black feminist, to articulate their feminist agenda. The Combahee River Collective highlighted their aims in hopes of creating a strong group and powerful objectives that would translate to society at large. If you are interested in feminism, women, and black feminist power you need to check this article out!

10/10

feminism, feminist studies, feminist theory, postcolonial theory, science and technology

Article Review: Donna Haraway, “Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective,” in Feminist Studies, Vol. 14, No. 3 (Feminist Inc., 1988), 575-599.

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(photo credits to link provided: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donna_Haraway)

From one of my all time favorite feminist theorists, Donna Haraway, discusses how the idea of the objective/subject is nothing more than an illusion. Donna Haraway discusses in her essay entitled, “Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspectives,” the ability to be completely biased and unattached from the subject is much more complicated than that. Haraway’s thesis states, “I want to argue for a doctrine and practice of objectivity that privileges contestation, deconstruction, passionate construction, webbed connections, and hope for transformation of systems of knowledge and ways of seeing” (584-585). Haraway’s thesis is defended by the use of re-defining individuals and their position. She goes on further to state, “where partiality and not universality is the condition of being heard rational knowledge claims…the view from a body, always a complex, contradictory, structuring and structured body” (589). In other words, Haraway is arguing that the partial is more credible than the unattainable totalized explanation.

For example, Haraway calls attention to what she defines as “feminist objectivity…[which is] about limited location and situated knowledge, not about transcendence and splitting subject and object” (583). This way of viewing narratives, especially historical narratives, suggests a new way of interacting with colonizer/colonized, slave/master, citizen/state, power/powerless etc . This way of reading or analysis blurs binaries and may suggest agency to subjects that changes the position of these actors.

The term situated knowledge is crucial in understanding what Haraway’s article. Situated knowledge can be understood as a relationship between the binary of colonized/colonizer, not as a top down dynamic (592). Instead it is a blurred, symbiotic, and complicated relationship.

This type of analysis adds to a new way in seeing object and subject relation; in the case of nation and its citizens complicates the historical narratives. It also pushes back at scientific and historical ways of othering and objectifying subjects. This is a helpful theoretical underpinning in academic discussions on how history is told as well as how the nation interacts with its citizens and vice versa. Haraway’s essay is also helpful in grappling with academic discussions on nation building, legacy of empire, and the paradox of contradiction in colonial histories. A new way of looking at the world and a new way at re-imagining the story– a must read!

10/10

 

american feminist literature, american literature, feminist studies, feminist theory, herstory, history, history of africa, history of europe, history of india, history of magic, history of the united states, literature, political theory, postcolonial theory, religious studies, science and technology, short story, subaltern studies, Uncategorized, witchcraft, world history

Magickal Reviews

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“You ran away to find freedom, and you found it. You made it. Now you gotta tell it. You gotta figure out how to tell the story.” — Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha